Dust To Dust: How Retaining The Ashes Never Felt So Bittersweet

It wasn't meant to be like this: the Ashes are retained

It wasn’t meant to be like this: the Ashes are retained

Despite the very best efforts of the hype machine, this is not 2005. Retaining the Ashes, and don’t forget this is the first time in my cricket watching life that England have clung onto the prize in three successive series, was an oddly muted affair. Of course the Manchester rain ensured that the Australians were denied the opportunity to complete the deserved victory they needed to keep matters alive, but even that would have just delayed the inevitable. The problem is that the home side is simply better but is crumpling under the weight of its own negativity and siege mentality, while the visitors are winning the propaganda war, and the tactical manoeuvres, yet lack the resources on the frontline. Beating this lot is probably no big deal, but doing it in this manner is even less satisfying.

Continue reading

Blaming DRS Is Shooting The Messenger

Umpire Aleem Dar is unmoved by an Australian appeal

Umpire Aleem Dar is unmoved by an Australian appeal

If the first Ashes Test teetered on a knife edge and the second turned out to be among the most one-sided in history, then there was at least a common thread which united them. Both were mired in umpiring controversies, the deconstruction of which filled column inches that ought to have been reserved for stylish straight drives or unplayable outswingers. The Decision Review System (DRS), an innovation designed to assist the match officials but one which has struggled for universal acceptance, absorbed much of the blame. The Luddites were called to arms once more. Such criticism is missing the point. Abandoning this aid will not stop television companies investing in new technologies to enhance their viewers’ enjoyment. Unless harnessed to the cause, these ultra-slow-motion replays, Hawkeye, Hot-Spot and whatever may supersede them, will only further undermine the integrity of those who have just their eyes to trust in. This easy target is a red herring obscuring a more significant problem.

Continue reading

Lehmann’s Guide To The Ashes

Darren Lehmann lightens the mood with skipper Michael Clarke

Darren Lehmann lightens the mood with skipper Michael Clarke

We’re only two days into the series and already it’s utterly riveting. Enough swings of fortune and shifts of momentum have been shoehorned into six sessions to silence even the most ardent detractor of Test cricket. Not that you’ll find too many of those around in an Ashes year. It’s a paltry sample of course but one particular misconception has been laid firmly to rest. It’s the one, never shared in these quarters, that purported Australia would be a pushover. Oh no, there is a glass jaw about England and the combative Antipodeans fancy themselves to land the knockout punch. Even more so now that the pugilistic and gloriously straightforward Darren Lehmann has assumed the reins. If the home side thought the turmoil of the opposition build-up would place them on the front foot, they’ll be more than just a little concerned to be pinned back on the crease fending off the short stuff.

Continue reading

Beware Clarke Danger To England’s Urn

Michael Clarke

Michael Clarke

One thing Andy Flower could never be accused of is complacency. Indeed, since he became England’s Director of Cricket in 2009, the Zimbabwean has left no stone unturned in guiding his adopted nation to the pinnacle of the Test game. Under captain Andrew Strauss, England have gained a well-deserved reputation for thorough preparation and meticulous planning. Focus is very firmly on maintaining the top ranking in what promises to be an epic series against their closest challengers South Africa later in the summer. With a tough engagement in India also on the horizon, Australia are not uppermost in the mind. Having dismissed the old enemy so contemptuously in their own backyard to retain the Ashes just eighteen months ago, theirs is no longer perceived to be the greatest threat. But never underestimate a wounded beast. A new era is dawning under the Southern Cross, and the man at the helm is confident of his destiny. Michael Clarke has silenced the detractors, and he’s ready to stamp his impression.

Continue reading